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Looking for ifr avionics

Roofermcgee

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I would like to upgrade my cherokee 180 to fly ifr. I would like to start working on my ifr rating and néed some basic but usable avionics to install in plane to start training. The 180 has only 120smoh, so I plan on keeping this plane for another year or two and then upgrading, so don't want to spend very much. I have a terra txn960 and mx170 in now. If anyone is upgrading some avionics out of a cherokee 180 that they want too sell let me know. Or if someone has ideas on basic setups I can use or need let me know.
 

raymos

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I considered doing the same with my 140 and worked with Bob Hart @ www.AvionixHelp.com to get an idea of my options and costs. Very knowledgable. I opted to not upgrade due to the lack of ROI. A 180 is more suited to the investment, IMO.


Ray - PA-28-140 near Savannah,GA
 

Jeff K

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I would like to upgrade my cherokee 180 to fly ifr. I would like to start working on my ifr rating and néed some basic but usable avionics to install in plane to start training. The 180 has only 120smoh, so I plan on keeping this plane for another year or two and then upgrading, so don't want to spend very much. I have a terra txn960 and mx170 in now. If anyone is upgrading some avionics out of a cherokee 180 that they want too sell let me know. Or if someone has ideas on basic setups I can use or need let me know.
Nothing is like chum in the water on an aviation board then spending someone elses money. But I'm going to disappoint you. Just go get a current IFR certification on your aircraft and go fly.

Presuming either the MX170 or terra txn960 has the glideslope hooked up, you should be good to go. You can do two non-precision approaches with them (VOR and Localizer) and one precision (ILS). If you are going to fly real IFR I'd also get pitot heat.

But that's it. I've had three airplanes with not much more then that and I'm averaging 40+ hours of real IFR logged every year. Those days are fast coming to a close however and I have a IFR GPS on my 2015 budget, but since you said you were selling in a year or two I'd not bother. You'll never get your money out of it.


From: http://www.faa.gov/training_testing/testing/test_standards/media/faa-s-8081-4e.pdf

Flight instruments are those required for controlling the aircraft without outside references. The required radio equipment is that FAA-S-8081-4E 8 which is necessary for communications with air traffic control (ATC), and for the performance of two of the following nonprecision approaches:

very high frequency omnidirectional range (VOR), nondirectional
beacon (NDB), global positioning system (GPS) without vertical
guidance, localizer (LOC), localizer-type directional aid (LDA), simplified
directional facility (SDF), or area navigation (RNAV) and one precision
approach
: instrument landing system (ILS), GNSS landing system (GLS),
localizer performance with vertical guidance (LPV) or microwave landing
system (MLS). GPS equipment must be instrument flight rules (IFR)
certified and contain the current database.
 

Roofermcgee

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I do have pitot heat and neither one of my radios has glideslope. What would leave the cheapest route to get the plane IFR capable.
 
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Jeff K

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I do have pitot heat and neither one of my radios has glideslope. What would leave the cheapest route to get the plane IFR capable.
A current IFR cert would get the plane IFR capable... just not capable of training you on a precision approach. I do VOR-A approaches all the time still so that's quite useful.

The cheapest route for your IFR training would be to train in your plane for the non-precision approaches and use a handheld GPS simulating a glide-slope precision approach OR a GPS precision approach . Do your checkride/PTS in a rental plane that has and IFR certified version of one or the other. Also practice an ILS or GPS precision in the rental plane for a few hours. Once you get a handle on the non-precision approaches the precision approach will seem very easy. The big secret to IFR approaches is to have your approach stabilized. At least it was for me.

To put in a glide slope capable radio with labor you'd be in excess of $2K and be bumping up to close to $10K to buy/put in a used WAAS GPS (I wouldn't bother with a non-WAAS GPS at this point).

That said, are you sure the txn960 doesn't have glideslope? It was an option but most of the used ones I'm seeing have that option. Perhaps just an antenna would need to be installed... that wouldn't be that expensive. That's about the only upgrade in your situation I'd do considering your window to sell this airplane is a year or two.

I got my IFR rating in 8 days and 3 years. The 8 days was to finish the last ~30 hrs after stringing out the 10 hours over 3 years. Pass your written if you already haven't and immediately start training. Take a week or two off work. I owned my own airplane as you did but I used a sim extensively... you can log I think up to 30 hrs. My day would begin with ~2-4 hours on the SIM, lunch, then another 2-4hrs in my own airplane practicing the exact same things in my airplane we did in the SIM. Again, once you master the approach in the SIM, it's easier in the airplane. Strongly recommended + it likely will save you a little money or at least not cost you more then flying your own plane (since the Sim isn't burning fuel/adding hours to your engine). But that's not the reason.... the SIM is just an excellent tool for IFR training.... as you can preset it to the approach and do it over and over quite a bit faster then the real thimg.

You want to focus on getting the rating.
 
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rrc1962

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I do have pitot heat and neither one of my radios has glideslope. What would leave the cheapest route to get the plane IFR capable.
I started my IFR training way back in the late 80's in a 140. It had ADF, one VOR and an old loran. I got the plane IFR certified and trained on instrument flying and non precision approaches. When it came time for the precision approaches and check ride the plan was to use the school plane. Seemed a lot more cost effective than upgrading the 140.

My CFI and I did a bit of actual IMC flying and some real approaches to minimums in that plane. The IFR cert is really just a check of the static system. You avionics will determine what approaches you can fly.

Turns out life got in the way and I never finished. Now I'm doing it all over again in our Six.
 
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