Piper Forum > Piper Models > Cherokee > 236 Tapered Wing


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 04-18-2013, 05:29 PM   #1
JunkMD
Member
 
JunkMD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 47
Liked 3 Times on 2 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default 236 Tapered Wing

As I have been reading about the tapered wing on the 236, there seems to be some debate regarding it's stall characteristics. Anyone have an opinion on this and/or information. I've not been able to find a lot "Google wise." Thanks.



__________________
JunkMD is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-18-2013, 06:36 PM   #2
sourdough44
Senior Member
 
sourdough44's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 958
Liked 54 Times on 51 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

I was up just the other day doing some slow flight and stalls with my taper wing. To me it feels as forgiving as any airplane wing can be, almost any way. It's easy to keep mushing along with the stall warning horn going off.

I haven't flown the straight wing recently, for comparison. As I remember it was forgiving too. I do have vortex generators, though I doubt they make that much difference.



__________________

160 HP 1974 Warrior

sourdough44 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-18-2013, 08:51 PM   #3
Ed Dartford
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 2,636
Liked 259 Times on 212 Posts
Likes Given: 182

Default

The tapered wing is sexy. That's it.

__________________
Ed Dartford is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-19-2013, 01:39 AM   #4
JunkMD
Member
 
JunkMD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 47
Liked 3 Times on 2 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

See, I agree with both your comments. First, it's a sexy look. Period. But, see in my little time with my plane, I've found the controls to be very responsive. The flight instructor with me said you can fly these things in slow flight all day long without a good break in the stall. But then I saw some things in some of the other forums and on the internet saying it makes it less stable and prone to spin.

Thanks for the feedback.

__________________
JunkMD is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-19-2013, 01:54 AM   #5
Gary235
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 143
Liked 13 Times on 11 Posts
Likes Given: 33

Default

147 replies and counting:

"Hershey Bar" or "Taper-Wing" Which is better?

http://www.piperforum.com/f9/hershey...g-better-2682/

__________________
Gary235 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-19-2013, 12:58 PM   #6
DaveB
Senior Member
 
DaveB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: S.E. MI KVLL
Posts: 985
Liked 47 Times on 39 Posts
Likes Given: 19

Default

On my BFRs my CFII loves to make me fly around with the stall horn blaring. Says it's music to her ears LOL. You can basically forget the ailerons at that point. If the plane is rigged well it will barely fall off.

__________________
DaveB
KVLL SE MI
1974 ArchWarrior
DaveB is online now  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-23-2013, 09:53 PM   #7
RNC
Lifetime Supporting Member
PiPe_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: DFW
Posts: 719
Liked 90 Times on 75 Posts
Likes Given: 172

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JunkinsMD View Post
See, I agree with both your comments. First, it's a sexy look. Period. But, see in my little time with my plane, I've found the controls to be very responsive. The flight instructor with me said you can fly these things in slow flight all day long without a good break in the stall. But then I saw some things in some of the other forums and on the internet saying it makes it less stable and prone to spin.

Thanks for the feedback.
The guy who got me into flying was telling me he did his CFI checkride in a Cherokee many moons ago, and said neither him nor the examiner could get it to spin. He tried 3 times and after the examiner gave him a hard time he said "fine you spin it" and the examiner gave up after two more tries. He said they could get a wing to dip, but it wouldn't turn over. When I first checked out in a 180 rental the CFI actually showed me the 'flutter stall' and said they wanted people to know how to do it (if you lose power and can't find a place to land normally, just stall it and don't let it recover, it will flutter to the ground). In his words, since the plane has no tendency to spin if you need to put it in some tree tops, do it that way.

Having flown both, most of the variations are little differences in feel, not so much in performance, I agree with Ed. The fat wings are a little easier to land, the tapered wings seem a little smoother in turbulence from my experience. There is no clear advantage to one or the other if that's what you're asking, just little differences.
__________________

Last edited by RNC; 04-23-2013 at 10:00 PM.
RNC is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-24-2013, 01:18 AM   #8
PaulR
Senior Member
 
PaulR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: KORH Worcester Airport
Posts: 3,199
Liked 182 Times on 170 Posts
Likes Given: 71

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by RNC View Post
The guy who got me into flying was telling me he did his CFI checkride in a Cherokee many moons ago, and said neither him nor the examiner could get it to spin. He tried 3 times and after the examiner gave him a hard time he said "fine you spin it" and the examiner gave up after two more tries. He said they could get a wing to dip, but it wouldn't turn over. When I first checked out in a 180 rental the CFI actually showed me the 'flutter stall' and said they wanted people to know how to do it (if you lose power and can't find a place to land normally, just stall it and don't let it recover, it will flutter to the ground). In his words, since the plane has no tendency to spin if you need to put it in some tree tops, do it that way.

Having flown both, most of the variations are little differences in feel, not so much in performance, I agree with Ed. The fat wings are a little easier to land, the tapered wings seem a little smoother in turbulence from my experience. There is no clear advantage to one or the other if that's what you're asking, just little differences.
Thats only true its tough to get into a spin in a landing/departure stall when straight and level
in my Archer, but put in some bank and pitch attitude and easy to induce a stall and spin and easy to recover from. Hard to believe and examiner couldn't do it and thinking he didn't want too.
__________________
PaulR is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-24-2013, 06:07 PM   #9
JunkMD
Member
 
JunkMD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 47
Liked 3 Times on 2 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

RNC and Paul,

Thanks for that feedback. Along those same lines, I have another question that some of you guys who have been in Pipers for a long time may can answer. The purchase of my Dakota a couple of weeks ago is actually the first time I have ever flown a Piper so my experience and research is limited. I have had so many good comments from those who have flown them, I didn't really research the accident database much until after I got it. If you look at AOPA or NTSB, I can't seem to find any Dakota specific information on accidents but rather all PA28s. It seems there are a lot of accidents but, as I look at them, it appears that this may be for a couple of reasons. First, the sheer number of PA28s in the air is higher than a lot of aircraft. Next, it seems like these accidents are like other accidents I see-the common things like VFR into IMC, stall/spin near the runway, etc.

I preface all this to ask the following: In your research of our aircraft, is there any type-specific reason for the accident rate? I haven't actually been able to find the accident rate/time flown anywhere yet.

Thanks in advance for all the input!

Jason

__________________
JunkMD is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-24-2013, 08:31 PM   #10
JimC
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 4,450
Liked 354 Times on 278 Posts
Likes Given: 289

Default

PA28's are quite safe, though they can be very difficult to get out of a spin once it is fully developed.

When I learned to fly in a Piper Cub in 1965, they had the third highest fatality rate per hour flown of any general aviation aircraft.



__________________
JimC is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Wing X new features TEG916 General Piper Discussion 18 10-30-2012 06:34 PM
Alaska Wing Men Edd General Piper Discussion 3 01-12-2011 12:56 PM
Wing Tips jmw Maintenance 3 09-14-2010 11:27 AM
Wing Leveler? cathead Cherokee 3 05-05-2010 02:53 PM
Wing Leveler? cathead General Piper Discussion 3 12-31-1969 11:00 PM

This forum is provided for entertainment purposes only. Piperforum.com is not affiliated or endorsed by Piper Aircraft Inc. or its subsidiaries.